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Arriva il sistema che converte l’aria in acqua_alt tag

The system that converts air into water

The innovation, developed with the University of Pavia, can provide drinking water where none is available. It is already in use in many nations and is showing excellent results

MILAN – They are Seas, the Swiss company who want to resolve one of the greatest issues of modern times: providing water to those areas of the world where it is in short supply due to poverty or because of a particularly hostile climate. Currently 880 million people in the world do not have access to drinking water. Every year, 3.4 million people lose their lives due to this lack of access, as a result of diseases that are often easily spread.  To combat these numbers, Seas has created the Awa Modula (air to water to air), an innovative system capable of producing water from air in areas where there are no springs, rivers, lakes or other water sources. All without creating pollution or upsetting the existing ecosystem.

Water generated by the Awa Modula

Each system is capable of producing up to 10 thousand litres a day, representing a fully reliable, potentially limitless and inexhaustible source. How is the AWA Modula powered? In line with its objectives, it can utilise the greener energies currently available on the market. It can even take advantage of electricity produced from the wind or sun.

The system filters ambient air, condensing steam into distilled water. This, after further filtering, is subjected to a special ultraviolet ray treatment to clean off bacteria and any other harmful substances. Once this operation is finished, the water is re-mineralised

Where are Awa Modula already in operation?

The entire project, whilst possessing a Swiss patronage, was developed with the University of Pavia. Currently the system is in operation in countries such as Lebanon, the United Arab Emirates, South Africa, Mexico and Peru. Some Caribbean islands are also beginning to test its effectiveness. Finally, in 2015, an Awa Modula was donated to UnaKids, a charity that fights to improve the lives of children and adolescents in regions of the planet that have been ravaged by war. 

by Salvatore Galeone